Strategic Plan 
2017-2022

Donnelly College has re-envisioned its current Strategic Plan framework by realigning the plan with the College’s Mission, Vision and Values while using accepted criteria for assessing excellence in higher education as established by the Higher Learning Commission (HLC).

The HLC criterion for accreditation was utilized as a framework for each core:

  • Mission
  • Integrity – Ethical and Responsible Conduct
  • Teaching and Learning – Quality, Resources, and Support
  • Teaching and Learning – Evaluation and Improvement
  • Resources, Planning, and Institutional Effectiveness

The strategic planning process was developed using the Plan-Do-Study-Act model of strategic planning with permission from Miami Dade College. Information was gathered to identify the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats (SWOT), of the institution from key stakeholders, including faculty, staff, students, Board of Directors, and industry advisory board members. A focus group of Student Senate leadership provided input and evaluation of the College’s program and support services. A Strategic Planning Task Force consisting of faculty and staff was established to review the data collected, HLC Criteria for Accreditation, and HLC Assumed Practices to define the institutional goals.


Mission Statement

Donnelly College is a Catholic institution of higher education that seeks to continue the mission of Jesus Christ in our time by making the love of God tangible in our world.

Specifically, the mission of Donnelly College is to provide education and community services with personal concern for the needs and abilities of each student, especially those who might not otherwise be served.


Vision Statement

The vision of Donnelly College is to advance the common good by being the most accessible and transformative Catholic college in the country. 1

  • Common Good

Donnelly seeks to provide opportunity for all people, whether as groups or individuals, to reach their fulfillment more fully and easily. It encompasses respect, social well-being and development, and stability and security.

  • Accessible

Donnelly maintains an open and welcoming environment for anyone seeking a post- secondary education. Costs are intentionally kept affordable to allow a quality private College experience. It also means an urban core location, an open admissions policy, program options to meet students’ needs, and an opportunity to explore faith.

  • Transformative

Donnelly seeks to provide an educational experience that encourages students to think as individuals, to develop relationships, and to take responsibility for helping the world become a better place.


Donnelly’s Values

The three values2 are the pillars of our mission at Donnelly College:

  • Seek Truth

Donnelly seeks to inspire life-long discovery and the communication of truth by exploring the connectedness all things, studying the intersections of faith and reason, and engaging in civil dialogue with all peoples.

As a Catholic institution of higher education, we are a community of scholars, “fellow learners,” seeking to discover and communicate truth as best we can grasp and understand it. We believe that faith and reason (fides et ratio) “…bear harmonious witness to the unity of all truth.” (Ex Corde Ecclesiae, 17). A Catholic college “is a place of research, where scholars scrutinize reality with the methods proper to each academic discipline, and so contribute to the treasury of human knowledge. Each individual discipline is studied in a systematic manner; moreover, the various disciplines are brought into dialogue for their mutual enhancement.” (Ex Corde Ecclesiae, 15). Donnelly College students, staff and faculty seek truth in all things.

  • Build Community

Rooted in Christian and Benedictine values, Donnelly seeks to motivate actions and relationships that promote a just community, recognizing that every person has inherent dignity and potential, and that we serve God by serving God’s people.

Rooted in Benedictine and Christian values, Donnelly College is proud of its diverse and inclusive community. We seek “to do justice, and to love kindness, and to walk humbly with God” (cf Micah 6:8). Donnelly College faculty and staff seek to serve our students and the greater community, instilling in each person a sense of their great dignity, their personal vocation and their call to be servant leaders. Donnelly College is committed to build community in all places.

  • Pursue Excellence

Donnelly seeks to challenge people to become the best version of themselves in their vocation, personal life, civic engagement and faith pursuit. Excellence requires perseverance amidst obstacles, striving beyond what is comfortable, openness to new ideas, a commitment to quality and concerted effort.

Donnelly College serves our faculty, staff and students best when we challenge each other to become “the best versions of ourselves.” We strive for excellence in scholarship, in the classroom and in our various extra-curricular activities. We strive for personal holiness and virtue through our varied religious traditions and practices. As a community and as individuals, we accept the ongoing challenge to grow and improve, to preserve and keep striving, to always reach higher in our goals and efforts. Donnelly College pursues excellence at all times.


Strategic Planning Task Force

Cheryl Hicks (Chair)

Vice President of Business Affairs

David Cobb

Assistant Professor, Liberal Arts & Sciences, Mathematics

Paula Console-Șoican

Assistant Professor, Liberal Arts & Sciences, English

Sister Marie Kathleen Daugherty

Endowed Chair for the Humanities

Megan Jordan

Academic Advisor

Laura McKnight 

Grants Manager

Gretchen Meinhardt

Assistant Professor, Success First

Casey Rooman-Smith

Coordinator, Academic and Student Affairs

Kisha Stevenson

Director of Admissions

Leslie Ulloa-Mora

Payroll/Accounting Specialist

Ex-Officio Members:

Msgr. Stuart W. Swetland

President

Pedro Leite

Vice President of Academic and Student Affairs/Dean

Emily Buckley

Vice President of Development

Fr. John Melnick

Vice President of Spirituality and Mission


Higher Learning Commission (HLC) Criteria for Accreditation

Criterion One. Mission

The institution’s mission is clear and articulated publicly; it guides the institution’s operations.

1.A. The institution’s mission is broadly understood within the institution and guides its

operations.

1.B. The mission is articulated publicly.

1.C. The institution understands the relationship between its mission and the diversity of society.

1.D. The institution’s mission demonstrates commitment to the public good.

Criterion Two. Integrity: Ethical and Responsible Conduct

The institution acts with integrity; its conduct is ethical and responsible.

2.A. The institution operates with integrity in its financial, academic, personnel, and auxiliary functions; it establishes and follows policies and processes for fair and ethical behavior on the part of its governing board, administration, faculty, and staff.

2.B. The institution presents itself clearly and completely to its students and to the public with regard to its programs, requirements, faculty and staff, costs to students, control, and accreditation relationships.

2.C. The governing board of the institution is sufficiently autonomous to make decisions in the best interest of the institution and to assure its integrity.

2.D. The institution is committed to freedom of expression and the pursuit of truth in teaching and learning.

2.E. The institution’s policies and procedures call for responsible acquisition, discovery and application of knowledge by its faculty, students and staff.

Criterion Three. Teaching and Learning: Quality, Resources, and Support

The institution provides high quality education, wherever and however its offerings are delivered.

3.A. The institution’s degree programs are appropriate to higher education.

3.B. The institution demonstrates that the exercise of intellectual inquiry and the acquisition, application, and integration of broad learning and skills are integral to its educational programs.

3.C. The institution has the faculty and staff needed for effective, high-quality programs and student services.

3.D. The institution provides support for student learning and effective teaching.

3.E. The institution fulfills the claims it makes for an enriched educational environment.

Criterion Four. Teaching and Learning: Evaluation and Improvement

The institution demonstrates responsibility for the quality of its educational programs, learning environments, and support services, and it evaluates their effectiveness for student learning through processes designed to promote continuous improvement.

4.A. The institution demonstrates responsibility for the quality of its educational programs.

4.B. The institution demonstrates a commitment to educational achievement and improvement through ongoing assessment of student learning.

4.C. The institution demonstrates a commitment to educational improvement through ongoing attention to retention, persistence, and completion rates in its degree and certificate programs.

Criterion Five. Resources, Planning, and Institutional Effectiveness

The institution’s resources, structures, and processes are sufficient to fulfill its mission, improve the quality of its educational offerings, and respond to future challenges and opportunities. The institution plans for the future.

5.A. The institution’s resource base supports its current educational programs and its plans for maintaining and strengthening their quality in the future.

5.B. The institution’s governance and administrative structures promote effective leadership and support collaborative processes that enable the institution to fulfill its mission.

5.C. The institution engages in systematic and integrated planning.

5.D. The institution works systematically to improve its performance.


Strategic Goals

  1. Cultivate support for the institutional mission and communicate accomplishments.
  2. Strengthen the culture of academic, financial, and social integrity.
  3. Expand conversations of cultural diversity, equality, and inclusion among the campus and surrounding communities within the context of Catholic belief.
  4. Focus on providing consistent and quality educational programs with emphasis on transferability, employability, and development of the whole person.
  5. Identify and prioritize improvements in infrastructure and resources to support education programs and student services.
  6. Integrate cultural competence and facilitate community, service learning, and spiritual formation across academic and co-curricular programs.
  7. Improve the commitment to the value and use of assessment for the continuous improvement of programs and services.
  8. Maintain appropriate and attainable goals for student recruitment, retention, persistence, and completion of programs.
  9. Operate on a balanced budget while improving working capital and generating reserves.
  10. Responsibly manage the resources entrusted to the institution.

Connecting the Goals to the Criteria for Accreditation

HLC Criteria

Goals

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

1

X

 

X

 

 

X

 

 

 

 

2

 

X

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

X

3

 

 

 

X

X

X

 

 

 

 

4

 

 

 

X

 

X

X

X

 

 

5

 

 

 

 

X

 

 

X

X

X

Approved by the Board of Directors on May 3, 2017.


Strategic Initiatives and Action Plans

Priority One – Academic and Co-Curricular Excellence


Initiative 1.1: The College will actively participate in the cultural and scholarly development of our students.

Action Plan

Start Date

Completion Date

Cost

A.  Host two major events each academic year that present on topics that are relevant, engaging, and that focus on the development of the whole student

and cultivate a community spirit.

Fall 2017

Ongoing

$7,500 per year

B.  Enhance annual co-curricular student activities, e.g. student clubs and intramurals.

Ongoing

Ongoing

$5,000 per year

C.  Conduct annual multicultural event.

Ongoing

Ongoing

$1,000 per year

D.  Sponsor five cultural and academic student workshops per academic year.

Fall 2018

Ongoing

$1,500 per year


Initiative 1.2: The College will use assessment data to develop curricula and programs.

Action Plan

Start Date

Completion Date

Cost

A.  Develop a framework to collect and analyze assessment data to inform continuous improvement.

Fall 2017

Fall 2018

$2,000

B.  Offer hybrid courses in each program.

Fall 2017

Ongoing

$26,000

C.  Strengthen pathways in STEM and Pre- Engineering by establishing articulation agreements with three other institutions.

Fall 2018

Fall 2020

N/A

D.  Promote Service Learning projects and completion through our academic programs.

Fall 2017

Ongoing

$2,000 per year

E.  Continue participation and project completion in the HLC Assessment Academy.

Fall 2017

Spring 2021

$55,000

F.  Develop an academic and co-curricular program review process.

Fall 2017

Spring 2019

N/A

G.  In conjunction with the Archdiocese, oversee an academic pre-theology program for potential seminary students.

Fall 2017

Fall 2019

$12,000 per year


Initiative 1.3: The College will implement a thriving campus ministry program.

Action Plan

Start Date

Completion Date

Cost

A.  Foster a dynamic Sacramental life for students, staff and faculty by offering daily mass, weekly confessions, and other devotional opportunities.

Fall 2017

Ongoing

$2,000 per year

B.  Facilitate Catechesis and Biblical studies for members of the Donnelly community.

Fall 2017

Ongoing

$2,500 per year

C.  Pastoral outreach to students seeking full integration into the Church by holding an annual RCIA program suitable for college students.

Spring 2018

Ongoing

$1,000 per year

D.  Sponsor and support a thriving Pro-Life Club.

Fall 2017

Ongoing

$2,000 per year

E.  Provide regular semester meetings for students, staff and faculty interested in aspects of campus ministry programming.

Fall 2017

Ongoing

$200 per year

F.  Hold ministry events each semester targeted to specific demographics or campus-wide participation.

Fall 2017

Ongoing

$2,000 per year


Initiative 1.4: The College will develop an internal and external communication plan.

Action Plan

Start Date

Completion Date

Cost

A.  Highlight successes and accomplishments of students and alumni.

Summer 2018

Ongoing

$15,000

B.  Highlight employee successes and accomplishments.

Fall 2017

Ongoing

N/A

C.  Promote the accomplishments, priorities and goals of the College.

Summer 2018

Ongoing

$15,000


Priority Two –Faculty and Staff Development

Initiative 2.1: The College will manage staffing levels sufficient for institutional needs.

Action Plan

Start Date

Completion Date

Cost

A.  Develop new employee orientation and on- boarding process.

Spring 2018

Spring 2019

N/A

B.  Standardize annual evaluations for all faculty and staff.

Fall 2017

Spring 2018

N/A

C.  Align salaries during annual budgeting process to stay competitive and retain qualified staff.

Fall 2018

Fall 2020

$25,000 per year


Initiative 2.2: The College will focus on faculty and staff development.

Action Plan

Start Date

Completion Date

Cost

A.  Provide annual trainings for all faculty on cultural competence, sensitivity training, ethics, diversity, and team building.

Fall 2017

Ongoing

$4,000 per year

B.  Maintain personnel records of professional development participation for 90% of employees.

Fall 2018

Ongoing

N/A

C.  Develop Individual Development Plans (IDPs) for all faculty and staff.

Fall 2017

Spring 2018

N/A


Initiative 2.3: The College will develop and/or update policies and procedures.

Action Plan

Start Date

Completion Date

Cost

A.  Develop a comprehensive institutional planning framework.

Fall 2019

Spring 2020

$2,500

B.  Review and/or update all departmental and campus-wide policies and procedures.

Fall 2017

Spring 2020 Ongoing

$1,000


Priority Three –Enrollment and Retention Growth

Initiative 3.1: The College will increase FTE built on reputation as a welcoming community for diverse cultures.

Action Plan

Start Date

Completion Date

Cost

A.  Expand recruiting populations

Fall 2017

Ongoing

$10,000 per year

B.  Create early enrollment incentives and events

Fall 2017

Ongoing

$30,000 per year

C.  Increase FTE to 500

Fall 2017

Spring 2022

$10,000 per year

D.  Maintain student to faculty ratio of 15:1.

Fall 2017

Ongoing

$15,000 per year

E.  Develop and annually review a recruitment plan.

Fall 2017

Ongoing

N/A

F.  Add a second LPN cohort

Fall 2018

Ongoing

$12,000

G.  Increase course offerings at Lansing Correctional Facility leading to an AAS with concentration in Business

Fall 2017

Spring 2019

$5,000 per year

H.  Receive approval and start an Associate of Nursing Degree (ADN/RN)

Fall 2017

Spring 2018

N/A

I.   Expand CCN program

Fall 2018

Spring 2019

$5,000

J.  Redesign and expand institutional scholarship and aid programs.

Fall 2017

Spring 2020

$500,000 per year


Initiative 3.2: The College will maintain or increase retention of students to match or exceed the national standard for two-year colleges.

Action Plan

Start Date

Completion Date

Cost

A.  Train and enforce mandatory attendance policy.

Fall 2017

Spring 2018

N/A

B.  Formalize and annually review a retention plan.

Fall 2017

Ongoing

N/A

C.  Train faculty and staff on policy and procedures of the early alert system.

Spring 2018

Ongoing

$1,000 per year

D.  Train faculty and staff on best practices for retention.

Spring 2018

Ongoing

$1,500 per year


Initiative 3.3: The College will increase persistence among students.

Action Plan

Start Date

Completion Date

Cost

A.  Continue and improve proactive advising.

Fall 2017

Ongoing

$10,000

B.  Establish “Fifteen-to-Finish” incentives.

Fall 2018

Spring 2019

$10,000

C.  Grow transfer pathways

Fall 2017

Ongoing

$5,000

D.  Connect students early with career opportunities in their field of interest.

Fall 2017

Ongoing

$10,000

E.  Improve completion rates.

Fall 2017

Ongoing

$5,000


Initiative 3.4: The College will maintain, cultivate, and grow external relationships.

Action Plan

Start Date

Completion Date

Cost

A.  Host high school counselors to broaden student recruitment

Fall 2017

Ongoing

$25,000

B.  Foster community, church and business leaders to provide internships, service learning projects and instructors.

Fall 2018

Ongoing

$1,000 per year

C.  Develop alumni and donors for institutional support.

Fall 2018

Ongoing

$10,000 per year

D.  Invest in marketing campaign.

Fall 2018

Ongoing

$500,000


Priority Four –Finance and Facilities Improvement

Initiative 4.1: The College will complete Campus Master Plan.

Action Plan

Start Date

Completion Date

Cost

A.  Complete Marian Hall renovations.

Summer 2017

Fall 2017

$2,000,000

B.  Payoff existing debt.

Fall 2017

2022

$600,000

C.  Expand fundraising plan and expenses to complete capital campaign.

Fall 2017

Fall 2019

$500,000

D.  Complete construction for new academic / administrative building

Fall 2018

2020

$19,500,000

E.  Provide centralized student services.

Fall 2018

Ongoing

$20,000

F.  Adopt comprehensive facilities management plan.

Fall 2020

Ongoing

$100,000 per year

G.  Research and secure options for student housing.

Fall 2020

Spring 2022

$50,000


Initiative 4.2 The College will improve annual budgeting process.

Action Plan

Start Date

Completion Date

Cost

A.  Involve director level staff and faculty in developing their program budgets.

Spring 2018

Ongoing

$15,000

B.  Use assessment data and align with strategic objectives.

Fall 2017

Ongoing

$5,000 per year


Initiative 4.3 The College will improve financial reporting.

Action Plan

Start Date

Completion Date

Cost

A.  Upgrade accounting software.

Spring 2018

Fall 2018

$15,000

B.  Assign restricted grants and donations ledger accounts for improved tracking and reporting.

Spring 2019

Fall 2020

N/A


Initiative 4.4: The College will increase revenue from all sources.

Action Plan

Start Date

Completion Date

Cost

A.  Increase tuition revenue as a percentage of overall revenue.

Spring 2018

2022

$150,000

B.  Reduce dependence on annual fund for operating budget by 10% annually (offset by increase in tuition and investment revenues).

Fall 2017

2022

N/A

C.  Increase endowment funds by 50%.

Fall 2017

2022

$4,000,000


Initiative 4.5 The College will develop and implement a plan to update/improve technology.

Action Plan

Start Date

Completion Date

Cost

A.  Increase budget to support scheduled equipment and software upgrades.

Spring 2018

Fall 2020

$75,000

B.  Improve SIS and LMS functionality to increase efficiencies, improve student support, and provide accurate and timely assessment data.

Fall 2017

Summer

2018

$125,000


Mapping the Initiatives to the Institutional Goals

Strategic Goals

Initiatives

1. Cultivate support for the institutional mission and communicate accomplishments.

1.4

 

3.4

 

2. Strengthen the culture of academic, financial, and social integrity.

1.1

2.1

2.3

 

4.2

4.3

3. Expand conversations of cultural diversity, equality, and inclusion among the campus and surrounding communities within the context of Catholic belief.

1.1

1.3

2.2

3.1

 

4. Focus on providing consistent and quality educational programs with emphasis on transferability, employability, and development of the whole person.

1.2

2.2

3.3

 

5. Identify and prioritize improvements in infrastructure and resources to support education programs and student services.

 

 

 

4.1

4.2

4.5

6. Integrate cultural competence and facilitate community, service learning, and spiritual formation across academic and co-curricular programs.

1.2

1.3

 

 

 

7. Improve the commitment to the value and use of assessment for the continuous improvement of programs and services.

1.2

 

 

4.2

4.5

8. Maintain appropriate and attainable goals for student recruitment, retention, persistence, and completion of programs.

 

 

3.1

3.2

3.3

4.5

9. Operate on a balanced budget while improving working capital and generating reserves.

 

 

 

4.2

4.3

4.4

10. Responsibly manage the resources entrusted to the institution.

 

2.1

2.2

 

4.1

4.5