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Published in 2018 Winter Issue 

Donnelly students get ready for trip to Costa Rica

Donnelly Students Travel to Costa Rica

Two Donnelly students and a Donnelly faculty member will be traveling to San Jose, Costa Rica, January 2-13, 2019 as part of a travel writing-focused course offered through the University of Kansas Honors Program. 

“I look forward to exploring Costa Rica with two of our Donnelly students,” said Paula Console-Șoican, assistant professor of English. “We will be traveling, taking notes and reading. These are three of my favorite things to do – I usually do them with my writer husband and my two children, and now I get to do them with two of my favorite students.”

According to the KU study abroad webpage, this Spring 2019 course and overseas 12-day program offers students the opportunity to investigate a variety of current issues in Costa Rican politics, culture, ecology, and tourism through lectures, field trips to sites of interest and individual research projects.

“My students have already learned about the history and genre of travel writing, which is a core component of this study abroad opportunity,”Console-Șoicansaid. “They have also examined the interdisciplinary range of the genre from botanical classification and cartography to adventure account and personal reflection. Next, I hope they will study everything from urban culture to ecotourism as they get to know Costa Rica.”

The program itinerary includes site visits to Monteverde Cloud Forest, Manuel Antonio National Park, Irazu Volcano, Hacienda Orosi hot springs, and a variety of museums and national landmarks.

Upon return, the Donnelly students will complete coursework through KU under the guidance of Console-Șoican. 

“They will be reading, writing, and working on research assignments relevant to both travel writing and Costa Rica,” she said. “There is a final project that will combine the two aspects of the course and students will present in the spring both at KU and at Donnelly.”

Campus master plan

Donnelly Receives $1 Million Challenge Grant from J.E. and L.E. Mabee Foundation

In October 2018, the J.E. and L.E. Mabee Foundation of Tulsa, Oklahoma awarded Donnelly College a $1 million challenge grant to support Phase III of our Transformations campus master plan. The Mabee Foundation has supported Donnelly College in several previous campus renovation projects, but this is the largest gift Donnelly has ever received from the Foundation. 

In Phase III, Donnelly will build a new 72,000-square-foot main academic building, replace the parking lot, and create green space and a campus quad. The new building will be the first academic building ever designed and built for Donnelly College. 

The Mabee Foundation issues their grants as “challenge grants,” and Donnelly must complete remaining project fundraising, totaling $10 million, within one year to receive the funds. 

“We are thrilled and honored with this grant,” said Monsignor Stuart Swetland, president. “The Mabee Foundation has affirmed just how important the mission of Donnelly College is to this community. This pledge also brings additional momentum and an important fundraising deadline for Phase III—the most comprehensive and ambitious phase of the plan.” 

The Transformations plan calls for three phases of improvements. Phase I was completed in 2013, with the construction of the Donnelly College Event Center – Donnelly’s first new building construction in more than 50 years. 

Phases II and III were re-envisioned in 2017, when Donnelly’s Board approved a revised master plan to comprehensively address College needs. In Phase II, the College completely renovated two floors of Marian Hall, which houses Donnelly’s Licensed Practical Nursing and Registered Nursing programs. Marian Hall also houses general classrooms and the Gateway to College Program, a dual credit high school completion program offered in partnership with the Kansas City, Kansas Public School District. Phase II renovations were completed in early 2018, and Marian Hall re-opened in January 2018.

The College worked with architects at Burns & McDonnell and our external project manager, MC Realty, to finalize Phase III plans and work through the Unified Government of Kansas City Kansas and Wyandotte County’s approval processes. Final project plans for Phase III were approved by the UG unanimously in late October. 

“Due to the aging state of Donnelly’s main academic building, we are looking forward to meeting the Mabee challenge and completing necessary fundraising so that we can begin construction on our new academic building as quickly as possible,” said Swetland. “Donnelly will be celebrating its 70th anniversary next fall, and I can imagine no greater testament to our mission and legacy than beginning construction on a new academic home that will be the foundation for future decades of service to this community. Our students are first-rate, and they need and deserve a first-rate academic environment.”

If you are interested in learning more about helping Donnelly meet the Mabee Foundation challenge by October 2019, please contact Emily Buckley at (913) 621-8731 or ebuckley@donnelly.edu.

Donnelly students in class

Donnelly Named Most Diverse College in Midwest for Second Year in a Row

For the second year in a row, Donnelly College has been named the most diverse college in the Midwest by U.S. News & World Report.

U.S. News & World Reportannually ranks colleges and universities on campus ethnic diversity. Donnelly attained a diversity index of 0.71. The closer the number is to 1, the more diverse the student population. For the 2016-2017 academic year, Donnelly’s student body was 83% students of color. More recently, the 2018 graduating class consisted of 79% students of color and included 77% first-generation college students. 

“We are very happy to receive again this national recognition highlighting one of our strongest assets – our diverse student body,” stated Donnelly College President Monsignor Stuart Swetland. “Students come to Donnelly for many reasons – our affordability, our urban location, our nurturing campus environment, and especially our academic programs. However, decade after decade, students tell us that student diversity is a top factor that helps them find success here.

It is rare to find a college that has a majority of minority students, especially in this region. As a Catholic college, we believe in the innate dignity and worth of each person, and that is something we strive to make tangible to our students each day in their campus experience. We know our students find comfort, security and confidence in that.”

Donnelly’s classification reflects the college’s status as the region’s only federally-designated Minority-Serving Institution and Hispanic-Serving Institution. The diversity found at Donnelly represents the institution’s commitment to serving the urban core since its founding in 1949. 

Of the top ten most diverse colleges in the Midwest, six institutions are in the state of Kansas. The full list can be found here

Sister Susan Wood

Theologian to Speak on Campus

As part of a grant through the National Endowment for the Humanities, Sr. Susan Wood, SCL, Ph.D., a Sister of Charity of Leavenworth, Kansas and professor of systematic theology in the Department of Theology at Marquette University, will offer two talks on campus, one for students and one for the public. 

Dr. Wood teaches courses on ecclesiology, Henri de Lubac, the nouvelle théologie, ecumenism, and sacramental theology, as well as more general courses in systematic theology. She is an associate editor of Pro Ecclesia and serves on the editorial advisory board of the journal Ecclesiology.Most of her writing explores the connections between ecclesiology and sacramental theology. 

Dr. Wood will offer a free public talk on April 4 at 7 p.m. in the Donnelly College Event Center.

Published in 2018 Summer Issue 

Rendering of future academic building

$5 Million Committment From Sunderland Foundation Is Largest in College History   

In June 2018, the Sunderland Foundation pledged $5 million to the support the third phase of Donnelly’s campus master plan.

“We could not be more grateful for the Sunderland Foundation’s extremely generous gift,” exclaimed Monsignor Stuart Swetland, president. “It is the single largest gift in our 69-year history and an affirmation of our mission. We are honored that the Sunderland Foundation is supportive of our vision and so committed to help us serve our wonderful students.”

The Sunderland Foundation has supported Donnelly’s mission since 1976 and has been especially instrumental in advancing our current master plan projects. The foundation supported the first two phases with gifts totaling $700,000. Phase I was completed in 2013 and Phase II in 2017.

“We are pleased to be able to help Donnelly provide its students with this new learning environment,” said Kent Sunderland, president and trustee of the foundation.

The Sunderland Foundation’s pledge continues momentum generated by several previous donors. In 2010, an anonymous alumnus pledged Donnelly’s first $1 million gift. In 2013, our sponsor, the Archdiocese of Kansas City in Kansas, commited $4 million and another friend of the college committed $2 million.

The Sunderland gift also came just a month after an anonymous new individual donor committed $1 million.

“The College has a bold vision to become the most accessible and transformative Catholic college in the country, and these investors are helping us make significant strides towards meeting that goal,” Monsignor Swetland added. “As a private college committed to quality and affordability, we depend on our philanthropic partners to help us achieve both our short-term campus improvements and our long-term vision. We are humbled by the faith these cornerstone contributors have placed in us to execute this mission and impact our students and community more fully.”

Graduates Celebrated At 69th Commencement Ceremony 

Donnelly College hosted its 69th Commencement Ceremony on Saturday, May 12 at the Savior Pastoral Center in Kansas City, Kan., honoring the graduating class of 2018. Kansas Governor Jeff Colyer was in attendance, providing a charge to graduates during the ceremony. This was the first time a sitting Governor has attended a Donnelly College commencement ceremony.

“Today as you walk off the stage, you are at a crossroads,” Gov. Colyer said. “You aren’t just making decisions, you are making choices. And these choices only come by opening your heart, opening your mind and your soul to all the growth and discovery and possibilities that’s there.”

The 2018 Donnelly College graduating class consists of 96 students – 35 students who received a Practical Nursing certificate, 11 students who earned a bachelor’s degree and 50 students who earned an associate degree. Of these graduates, 72 percent were first-generation college students.

During the commencement ceremony, two student speakers, LaCherish Thompson and Todd Kinney, addressed their fellow graduates.

Thompson spoke about how everyone has been talked out of dreams, dreams that have potential and are worth pursuing.

“Take back your dreams,” Thompson said. “So when I tell you the sky is the limit, tell me, ‘I’m ready to fly.’” And when I tell you to dream as big as the ocean, tell me, ‘The largest body of water cannot contain what I can do,’ and when I tell you that the possibilities are endless, as far as the East is from the West, tell me, ‘I can do all things through Christ (who) strengthens me,’ and when I tell you the world is yours, tell me, ‘I already have it in my hands,’ and when I say, you can be anything, absolutely anything you want to be, tell me, ‘I know I can and I will be.’”

During his student commencement speech, Kinney told the graduates that as long as they continue to fill their souls, they will be successful in life. 

“You have filled your souls with knowledge and grace and it will never die,” he said. “We can fly people to the moon and back in one piece, but even with all that, no human being can or ever will be able to touch, take away, create or destroy a living soul - only God can do that. Our souls (are) God’s everlasting gift to us. And that is why, as long as you continue to fill your soul with knowledge and grace, today is only the beginning. Only the first of your life victories.”

Donnelly alumna Dr. Liza Rodriguez ’01 provided the commencement address. Rodriguez challenged graduates to remain true to themselves, respect others and give back to the community. “I challenge you to one day stand on this podium and inspire future generations of college students to find their drive and fight for what they are passionate about,” she said. “The hardest mathematical equation and the toughest challenges in life help you grow strong and realize your truest potential. And never forget to help others on the way.”

Donnelly’s Commencement Ceremony also celebrated seven graduates from the Gateway to College program, a high school completion program partnered with (USD 500) Kansas City Kansas Public Schools, where students earn their high school diploma and receive college credit from Donnelly.

Following the Commencement Ceremony, Donnelly College’s Practical Nursing (PN) graduates were recognized in a pinning ceremony, which is a traditional rite of passage for nursing school graduates across the country.

The ceremony was led by Sandra Tapp, director of nursing, who congratulated the graduates for their many accomplishments during the 16-month program.

Graduates were pinned by a nursing faculty member or a nursing friend from the community who inspired them to pursue and finish the PN program. Donnelly’s PN graduates lit lamps and recited the traditional Florence Nightingale pledge to close the ceremony. 

Transforming Student Engagement

In the most recent Winter issue of the Donnelly Digest, we highlighted a professional development opportunity through the Association of College and University Educators (ACUE) for Donnelly College faculty, which was made possible through a grant from the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation. This academic year, faculty participated in ACUE coursework, where they learned about new teaching techniques to improve student learning and engagement. This piece was originally written for the ACUE blog by Melissa Lenos, Donnelly College associate professor and chairperson of liberal arts and sciences, and has been adapted for use in this publication.

I held up a paperback and met 13 pairs of uneasy eyes. It was hard to keep the excitement out of my voice as I explained, “We’re going to read Bleak House together and we’re going to read it as it was originally released—in serial form. We’ll do one installation a week over the course of the semester.” My excitement was two-sided: Bleak House, a 900-page novel, is one of my favorites, and I was nervous. I typically teach freshman writing courses, and it’s been a long time since I’ve had the opportunity to teach a hefty novel. I felt rusty, and also worried that the scale of the text might intimidate my students.

Reflecting back on my first semester of the ACUE course, I decided to build regular “Fishbowls” into the syllabus. In the ACUE course, Dr. Tara Lineweaver describes the Fishbowl activity as a “close-knit conversation among four students” seated in the center of their classmates, who form a circle around them. The students in Dr. Lineweaver’s class prepare a short paper based on the readings, and then during class, she pulls four names from a fishbowl, and those students discuss the assigned articles for 20 minutes. The rest of the students listen, take notes, and have an opportunity to comment after the discussion has ended. In my Comp 2 course, every Friday the students came prepared to discuss one serial segment of the novel. We randomly selected three or four students to discuss the novel for 15 to 20 minutes (depending on the length of that week’s segment) and then we regrouped for a whole-class discussion. I also created a large, adaptable concept map to help keep track of the novel’s 50-some characters and myriad intertwined themes.

By mid-semester, each student participated at least once in the Fishbowl. We’d spent time discussing contradictory perspectives on the text. Several of the students wrote term papers addressing some aspect of the representations of women in Bleak House.The students found sources that argue for Esther Summerson’s powerful agency and determination, while other sources dismiss her as weak and uninspiring.

During one Fishbowl, participants drew a previous conversation into their discussion, identifying moments that could be interpreted as supporting each point of view and considering how their perspectives of Esther had changed halfway through the novel.

They debated what Dickens intended the audience to think or feel about Esther based on how Esther, in her first-person chapters, describes herself and how other characters speak to and about her. The students then helped each other sort through one particularly confusing scene in the week’s reading and spent the rest of the Fishbowl debating developments in the overarching mysteries threaded through the novel.

Based on Fishbowl participation, wholeclass discussions and reading quizzes, I could tell that every student was current on the reading. In a typical section of Comp 2, 10 percent to 15 percent would be dangerously behind, consistently absent, or otherwise struggling at this point in the semester. More than that, when I came into class at 9 a.m., they were often already chatting about the week’s developments: Lady Dedlock’s shady behavior and Mr. Tulkinghorn’s ominous looming. They were particularly outraged by Mr. Guppy, greeting me with “Esther has a stalker!” Another warmed my heart, grumbling, “I wish Esther wouldn’t act so dumb when she’s not.” My students are pulling out interesting themes (Dickens’s portrayals of marriage, philanthropy, the legal system), noticing narrative trends, and asking compelling, complex questions.

As we approached midterms, I had the students reflect on their Fishbowl experience in a 10-minute “Exit Ticket” for the class, essentially a prompt they must respond to before leaving. I asked them what they felt was working well with the Fishbowl exercise and what they might change or do differently through the end of the semester. They all agreed that we should continue with the exercise—that it keeps them accountable to themselves and their classmates. Several mentioned that keeping up on the reading and taking thorough reading notes feels more important if you know classmates “might be counting on you” to help lead a discussion. At such a small school, most of these students have multiple classes together and check in with each other during the week. 

I found that every week’s content in the ACUE course impacted my teaching, but nothing has disrupted my personal pedagogy as much as the Fishbowl. I realized that I too frequently underestimate my students, that I jump in to “help” them too quickly, and that given control of class discussion, students will generate smart, provocative conversations. In restructuring the rhythm of my classes, my students have been given additional space to approach ideas from multiple perspectives. Every time we had a Fishbowl this semester, my students surprised me. 

Donnelly students on Black History Justice Journey trip

Student Explore Black History In Missouri and Beyond

A group of Donnelly faculty, staff and students embarked on a three-day Black History Justice Journey in March to experience historic sites related to slavery, the Civil War and the African-American experience.

“It was a wonderful opportunity to see the recorded history of our country’s past,” said Jose Marquez, Donnelly student. “We were able to travel to different locations and see sites and how they tied together from a historical standpoint and an ethical standpoint.”

Students visited the Lincoln Museum and home in Springfield, Ill.; the County Courthouse in St. Louis, Mo. where the Dred Scott case was tried; the town of Ferguson, Mo. which gained national attention in 2014 after the death of Michael Brown; and a home in Quincy, Ill. that belonged to Augustus Tolton, a Missouri man born into slavery, who escaped to freedom and became the first black Catholic priest in the U.S.

“I have always been passionate about travel and learning about other cultures and I love to share these interests with others,” said Gretchen Meinhardt, interim director of success first and trip leader. “College is a time of exploration for students, which makes it the perfect time to learn both in and out of the classroom. Learning about history in the classroom is great, but that learning is enhanced when we can get out of the classroom and see and experience history firsthand. One of our values at Donnelly is “truth,” and learning about other cultures is an important way to help students develop their own views based in a true understanding of others.”

Future educational travel opportunities through Donnelly may include both domestic and international destinations, including the possibility of a Latino Justice Journey to Chicago in 2019.